Because of the Oregon Trail, the United States includes California, Oregon, Washington, Nevada, Idaho, Utah and Wyoming. We are here in Wyoming because of some very brave people who came before us. We stand on the shoulders of giants.

As a nation, we believed it was our Manifest Destiny during the 19th century that the United States was destined to stretch from coast to coast. This westward expansion attitude helped to open the west. It was a scary venture where “you were leaving home forever. And you can't take anything.” A 2,000 mile walk, many without shoes.

HistoryNet explains “From about 1811-1840 the Oregon Trail was laid down by traders and fur trappers. It could only be traveled by horseback or on foot.” “In the spring of 1843, the first ripple of a coming tide of would-be settlers piled everything they owned into canvas-covered wagons, handcarts and any other vehicle that could move, and set out along a dim trace called ‘the Emigrant Road.’” It would become The Oregon Trail. “It ran beside waterways, stretched across tall-grass and short-grass prairies, wound through mountain passes, and then spanned the Pacific Slope to the promised lands of Oregon and California. One in 17 never made it.”

It ran though Wyoming and is evidenced by many historical sites. One permanent marker is just south of Guernsey, Wyoming and it bears witness to those who indelibly etched their struggles into the earth along the Oregon Trail.

Steve Cooper, Townsquare Media

I was impressed and I believe you will be too, by the history of Wyoming. It is an incredible story made up by thousands of individual stories. I suggest you investigate further. Oregontrail101, Oregon trail, BLM and  History.net are good places to start.