Do not annoy, provoke, anger, irritate, antagonize, infuriate or otherwise bug Wyoming federal judges.

Harvard Law School grad Brud Rossmann sure did when he filed a complaint Friday against Central Intelligence Agency Director Michael Pompeo.

U.S. District Court Judge Scott Skavdahl of Casper dismissed it within hours.

Skavdahl wasn't nice about it, either.

"Mr. Rossmann's 39-page complaint begins with several paragraphs of irrelevant self-grandiosity and follows with a rambling, tangential, largely-incoherent series of racial, religious, sexual-orientation, and gender-based epithets, with foul and obnoxious language interspersed regularly for dramatic effect," Skavdahl wrote in his opening paragraph.

Aw, judge, tell us what you really think.

Skavdahl was just warming up. "After 48 paragraphs of mostly rubbish, Mr. Rossmann finally gets around to alleging his causes of action."

Rossmann was seeking $10 million in damages and political asylum for "'False imprisonment, false enslavement in perpetuity, worse,'" and "'Attempted Murder, Extreme Torture, Scaled Robbery, Theft, Worse,'" and that "'Defendants have boasted as to their attempted murder of Brud Rossmann....'"

The complaint itself is sealed, which could raise a specter of paranoia, but Skavdahl said he had the right to do that that based on case law. Rossmann intended to "annoy, embarrass, and harass the many Defendants" as a malicious publicity stunt. That "heavily outweighs the public's interest in open access."

Anyway, we digress.

"The Court will not dignify the crass and inexcusable language by repeating any of it here ..."

Rossmann asked to file his case without prepaying the $400 fee "in forma pauperis," or "as a poor person," too. But Skavdahl also exercised his right to deny that because a court has the right to determine whether a court filing is frivolous or malicious.

"Mr. Rossmann's complaint is frivolous because it contains 'fanciful factual allegation[s],'" Skavdahl wrote.

Rossmann, who filed his complaint "pro se" (on behalf of himself without an attorney), claims he lives in Cheyenne, but that isn't true, the judge wrote. ""In reality, he is a serial litigator."

The U.S. District Court for North Dakota noted Rossmann, who listed an address in Fargo, N.D., has filed at least 48 lawsuits in federal courts in the past two years. Attempts to mail documents to his claimed Fargo address were returned as undeliverable, and the same thing happened in South Dakota. (Rossmann lists his Wyoming address as an apartment in Cheyenne.)

"His residence claims are nothing short of fanciful," Skavdahl wrote.

On the other hand, Rossmann's allegations are everything malicious, he wrote.

"The Court will not dignify the crass and inexcusable language by repeating any of it here, but suffice it to say that the complaint consists almost exclusively of insults, ad hominem attacks, and threats," Skavdahl wrote. "Relevant factual allegations and applicable legal theory are almost entirely absent, though."

Finally, whatever points Rossmann tries to make are lost because he doesn't attempt to identify who supposedly hurt him, which is weird because he's a 1989 graduate of Harvard Law School and could have made a case of some sort, Skavdahl wrote.

So Skavdahl said to heck with the whole thing. "Based on his allegations, the causes of action in this complaint are entirely meritless."