It all began in 1868. May 30th was established as a day to decorate the graves of those, originally, who had died defending the Union in the Civil War.

Later, it was a day to honor all our nation's war dead. In 19 71, the last Monday in May became the official day, and Monday, the annual observance at the Oregon Trail Veteran's Cemetery filled the chapel and spilled into the parking lot.

Senator John Barrasso told us it's a time to honor not only those who died defending freedom, but as Lincoln said, to rededicate ourselves to that purpose.

Michael Stedillie read the WW I classic poem In Flanders Fields, and told us, it isn't just about that conflict, but all wars.

Senator Barrasso and Congresswoman Liz Cheney urged the gathered to remember that freedom has a price, and the evidence can be seen in the rows of flags on the graves today and the names on the memorial wall.

Tangible evidence of every generation of men and women who stepped forward, raised their hands, and volunteered to save not only our freedom, but the freedom of others.