Winter is the time when nature is allowed to once again dominate Yellowstone National Park. Very few travelers which means wildlife tend to roam all over the park. A driver on a snowy Yellowstone backroad recently encountered one lone howling black wolf blocking the road.

I first saw this shared by USA Today. It's a video that Deby Dixon shared on Facebook on Christmas day. Deby is a photographer and based on the USA Today story had spotted members of the Wapiti Wolf Pack previous to this lone wolf moment.

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It's actually kind of comical to say this is a lone wolf. He/she might be the only wolf you currently see, but it's likely there are others from the pack somewhere nearby in the woods. That's especially likely if this black wolf is a member of the Wapiti Wolf Pack as it's the largest wolf pack population in Yellowstone.

It's a credit to Deby that she respectfully kept her distance from this wolf and gave him/her the space instead of zooming by like we sadly see all the time during the spring and summer months.

If you don't already, make sure to follow Deby's photography work on Facebook and the Yellowstone's Wild World website. She obviously has some sweet photography skills and has captured some epic Yellowstone wildlife moments.

LOOK: Stunning vintage photos capture the beauty of America's national parks

Today these parks are located throughout the country in 25 states and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The land encompassing them was either purchased or donated, though much of it had been inhabited by native people for thousands of years before the founding of the United States. These areas are protected and revered as educational resources about the natural world, and as spaces for exploration.

Keep scrolling for 50 vintage photos that show the beauty of America's national parks.

RANKED: Here are the most popular national parks

To determine the most popular national parks in the United States, Stacker compiled data from the National Park Service on the number of recreational visits each site had in 2020. Keep reading to discover the 50 most popular national parks in the United States, in reverse order from #50 to #1. And be sure to check with individuals parks before you visit to find out about ongoing, pandemic-related safety precautions at www.nps.gov/coronavirus.